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Put Your Foot in Your Mouth - Idiom

Video Overview

The idiom 'put your foot in your mouth' means to say something tactless or embarrassing, usually at an unfortunate moment. This video explains the meaning and use of the idiom 'put your foot in your mouth' in English. We explain how to use it with some easy examples to help you learn this idiom so you can use it in spoken and Business English.

Video Analysis

When you 'put your foot in your mouth', you say something tactless or embarrassing, usually at an unfortunate moment. This idiom expresses a form of regret and acceptance of blame, as it is usually the result of an accident or error of judgement rather than a deliberate act. Despite that, the result is often somebody being offended or upset. That can not only be embarrassing for you; it can also get you into trouble, particularly if the person you offended is someone in authority, like your boss. The expression can be used in a social and professional context, but is more common as a social blunder. In the UK, you are more likely to encounter the variation 'put your foot in it'. Phrases with a similar meaning include 'commit a faux pas', and 'shoot yourself in the foot'.


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