Expressions using Themes (e.g. Collocations, IELTS, Business English)

Information Technology Vocabulary

Here we look at many common expressions and vocabulary you might find in the Information Technology sector.


CRASH

In everyday life, we use this terminology when we speak about a collision between vehicles or when a vehicle collides with an object. Using this term in IT means a program or the entire operating system unexpectedly stops working. 


Examples

  1. “I would have had the project completed yesterday, but when the program crashed, I couldn’t progress any further. I had to leave the project for the day and come back to it this morning when the program came back online.”

  2. “The systems have been offline since Monday. We’ve lost thousands of euros the past two days and we can’t afford this happening again. After it’s fixed today, please take the necessary measures to ensure the operating system doesn’t crash on us again.”


MONITOR

The noun ‘monitor’ refers to a computer monitor, which is an output device that displays information in pictorial form. A monitor usually comprises the visual display, circuitry, casing, and power supply. Originally, computer monitors were used for data processing, while television sets were used for entertainment.

'Monitor' can also be used as a verb to observe and check the progress or quality of something over time; or keep it under systematic review.


Examples

  1. “Can everybody please keep an eye on your monitor throughout the day? We’ve discovered a virus in the system which spreads through an error message appearing on your screen. Please don’t click it. Just raise the issue if you come across it.”

  2. “I need to monitor this situation closely. If we can contain it, then we can dissolve it. Let’s not take any chance of this virus getting into our hard drives and corrupting everything. Let’s take extra precautions.”


IN LAYMAN’S TERMS

When someone says “In layman’s terms…”, they usually follow on from what they were saying by explaining it in simple language anyone can understand. So, when you use this term you describe a complex or technical issue using words and terms that the average individual (someone without professional training in the subject area) can understand.


Examples

  1. “The technology is complex and hard to explain, so I’ll put it in layman's terms to help you understand.”

  2. “Our new line manager is articulate. We’re learning so much from him. I really admire how he carries himself in meetings and explains things in layman’s terms so that everybody understands what’s expected of them.”


CALL IT A DAY

When someone calls it a day, they decide or agree to stop doing something for the day, or to give something up either temporarily or completely. We commonly use this idiom when someone gets tired of working on something and needs a break, or when someone indefinitely finishes working for a company or working on a contract.


Examples

  1. “After staying loyal to the company throughout a career spanning over four decades, CEO Mr. Logica finally called it a day. He thanked everyone that helped him achieve his success over the years and wished the company well into the future.”

  2. “I think we’ll call it a day on the project for this evening. Make sure you’re ready to go at it bright and early tomorrow morning. We’ve still got a lot of work to do.”


BALLPARK

When someone uses the word ‘ballpark’, they mean an area or range within which an amount or estimate is likely to be correct. This is commonly heard in the workplace, especially in IT and Finance.


Examples

  1. “I need those upgrades ready and working through the system by tonight. Can you give me a ballpark time for completion?”

  2. “Hi. As discussed, the compliance offer will meet with all of your employees to go through the measures we’ve put in place regarding the COVID-19 ‘return to work’ program. Can you give me a ballpark figure on how many employees he has to meet?”

Share post on :


XDownload