Expressions using Themes (e.g. Collocations, IELTS, Business English)

Collocations With The Word Mouth

Collocations are words that usually go together in English.

Here we are going to look at words that go with 'mouth' to make useful and popular expressions you will hear in social and professional contexts.


Bad-mouth

When you 'bad-mouth' something or somebody, you criticize or speak negatively about them. As a noun, it can be used to refer to somebody who says negative or critical things about others.

Examples

  • I don't want to bad-mouth Claire's proposal, but it is naive at best.
  • Why are you always bad-mouthing Alex? He seems like a good guy to me.
  • Frank is a real bad-mouth. Don't take anything he says about people too seriously.


Loudmouth/big mouth

A 'loudmouth' or a 'big mouth' is somebody who talks a lot, especially in an indiscreet, rude, or unthinking way.

Examples

  • Sarah is a bit of a loudmouth. She gets on everybody's nerves in the office.
  • I can't stand working with David. He's such a big mouth!
  • I let slip the secret and now Paul is in trouble. Me and my big mouth!


Leave a bad taste in the mouth

If something 'leaves a bad taste in the mouth', it causes an unpleasant memory or lingering feeling.

Examples

  • The way I was fired from that company leaves a bad taste in my mouth. It was very unfair.
  • It's hard to forgive what happened. The whole situation leaves a bad taste in the mouth.
  • As a regular customer, for Brenda to be spoken to so rudely by a member of staff left a bad taste in her mouth. She will not be shopping there in future.


Mouth off (to/about) (something/somebody)

When you 'mouth off', you express your opinion in an annoying or offensive way. 

  • Why did you have to mouth off to the boss like that? I wouldn't be surprised if he fires you.
  • I hear Jack has been mouthing off to you about me again. I don't know what his problem is.
  • Eddie mouthed off about having to work late, so I told him to be quiet and get on with it.


Mouth (something)

When you 'mouth something', you form words with your mouth but do not make a sound. It is usually done when you are trying to tell somebody something without others hearing.

Examples

  • In the meeting, Sandra mouthed something to me, but I couldn't make out what it was.
  • When the teacher asked me the question, I couldn't think of the answer. Luckily, Gary managed to mouth it to me in time.
  • After I beeped him, the driver of the other vehicle started mouthing obscenities at us. 


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