Expressions used in Everyday Spoken English in Social and Professional contexts

(get/give) a (head) start

give a head startget a startget a head start
Meaning(s)
1) to give someone an advantage, begin something
  • How to MemorizePopularity MediumProfessional MediumSocial
    • get a head start in life/in the market
  • Analysis
     If you 'give someone a head start' you set them up in a position where it is difficult for them to fail. 'Giving a head start' might include giving an advantageous position, resources or earlier starting time than others competing for the same opportunities and resources. This is an idiomatic expression used in professional and social contexts. You might give someone a 'head start' in a race, on a project, or socially: "Children who have access to books when they are young have a head start when it comes to education in later years." "I gave John a head start in the race because he is recovering from an injury."
  • Social Examples (Advance)
    1. Reading to your child at an early age can give them a head start in life by improving their vocabulary.
    2. In order to get a start in the Sports Industry, the young boy got a job selling jerseys on match days.
    3. Tom got a great start in the race, and moved into first position very quickly.
  • Professional Examples (Basic)
    1. By refusing to advertise, you are giving the competition a head start.
    2. The young graduate took an internship in order to get a start in the industry.
    3. Grants and enterprise schemes can help give a head start to entrepreneurs and start-ups in the marketplace.
  • Further Suggestions
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